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HEARING for the Nomination of Marc Baudin for Vice President of the United States

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Bangs gavel.

 

This committee shall begin hearings on the nomination of Marc Baudin to be Vice President of the United States. These hearings shall last 72 hours, which shall begin immediately following the opening statements from the nominee...

 

@Baudin

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Mr. Chairman, 

 

I will start by congratulating you on your appointment to the Chairmanship of the ASFAJ committee and know that I look forward to working with you on many important matters before this committee in the coming session of Congress.

 

Second, while I agree that this nomination is one of extreme importance and should be one of the Senate's top priorities, I believe that calling this hearing to order now is premature. We currently have a motion before the Senate to host a Committee of the Whole which would allow all members of the Senate to directly ask the Vice Presidential nominee their questions. Thus making this hearing redundant. As the motion has yet not been recognized, therefore, I ask you Mr. Chairman, to temporarily halt this hearing until the vote on the floor has been recognized and completed. If that vote fails, you will have my full support to proceed with this nomination hearing but if it passes, I would hope the Chairman would defer to the Committee of the Whole. 

 

I yield. 

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The Chair notes the honorable Members Point of Order, however, reminds him that unless further notice, the standard process of this committee, which is responsible for holding hearings for the Vice Presidential nominee, must be followed, respected, and maintained.

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Senator Baudin walks in and sits down. 

 

Mr. Chairman, Honorable Members of this Committee, 

 

It certainly is an odd feeling being on this side of things for a change. *laughs* I recall questioning many nominees in this very chamber, and I have always said that I would ensure they were given a rigorous and fair hearing. I expected the nominees I questioned to be respectful, candid, and civil and in the process of this hearing, I will make sure that I give the same courtesy to you, which I have expected from others. 

 

I was born into a family rooted in public service. My father worked for the State Department, and my mother was a Secretary at the State Department. She used to tell me and my siblings stories about her boss, Secretary John Foster Dulles, and the few times she met President Eisenhower. When I was still young, my father was stationed at Strasbourg, where I graduated High School. I have had a decidedly worldly education, and I find myself privileged to have received it.  I recognize that not everyone had such an honor, and it has been my goal to give what I can so that those who may otherwise not, can. 

 

A large part of my philosophy is that we are only as strong as our weakest link, and strength comes from opportunity, education, work. It is important to me that our children receive such assistance. That is why I became involved in community activism, and it is why I ran for United States Senate. 

 

Apart from my time in the Senate, I have served my country as a Foreign Service Officer for the United States Department of State for many years, and the impact it has had on me is incredible.  

 

When President LeClavers asked me if I would be willing to serve as his Vice President, I was honored. To be selected, out of a large pool of qualified individuals is an honor that I will strive every day to live up to. I spent a great deal of time in thought and prayer before accepting, but the reality is, when the President calls you to serve, you say yes. I owe it to this country, which has afforded me so many opportunities, to give back in any way that I can. I am ready to serve the American people not only as a representative but as an advocate. An advocate of compassion and aid in times of hardship, an advocate of dignity in times of indecency, and an advocate of our American values in times of uncertainty. 

 

I am ready and willing to serve. I submit myself to your questioning. 

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Mr Chairman,

 

I have a couple of questions for the nominee.

 

01. You're opposed by pro choice interests. I know you've backed liberal Supreme Court nominees and have a holistic picture on the issue. But if you were to somehow become President, what would federal abortion policy look like? Would you sign a twenty week abortion ban if a future Congress sent it to you? Would you reinstate the Mexico City Policy set by President Reagan?

 

02. You also have a pro gun streak. Again there's a number of laws like a national concealed carry. Would you sign it if Congress sent it to you?

 

03. How would you respond to the growing threat of Russia and China to the United States' hegemony around the globe? Do you believe the United States should continue to underpin the international system set in place since 1945?

04. Do you stand behind free trade deals like NAFTA and CAFTA? Do you believe that the United States should continue negotiating free trade deals?

 

05. Occasionally the Federal Government convicts and executes people on death row.  Timothy McVeigh being one of them. As President would you sign a death warrant sent to you for signature?

 

06. Do you back moving the United States to a targeted military strategy to handle radical Islamic threats - ie, Obama's smart bomb strategy and drone strikes? Or would you support the expansive use of military strikes to go after our enemies like using MOAB in Afghanistan?

 

07. How would you characterize the radical Islamic threat that has faced us since 2001? Would you call it a problem within Islam - a largely peaceful faith - or would you characterize it as something else?

 

08. You haven't cut a wide path in the Senate and you've been fairly quiet. As we know with President LeClavers, there's a good chance you could be behind the Resolute Desk. What can you tell us about what you are and why you should be Vice President.

 

I'll ask more later. Thank you.

 

I yield.

 

 

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Mr. Chairman,

 

I'd like to congratulate the nominee, and thank him for appearing before us to answer our questions. I have a few questions to start with.

 

My first question is, while the practice of law and years spent within the diplomatic ranks are certainly honorable professions, prior to your election to the United States Senate you had no real experience as an elected politician in either executive or legislative branches. In addition, not to be too frank, there seems to be no real record until very recently of you being a vocal voice on various policy matters or having any record of significant personal legislative accomplishments or bill sponsorship into your 2nd term as a US Senator. As such, could you perhaps explain what you believe your qualifications to be Vice President and by the nature of the position potentially President, are and perhaps expand on the scope of your conversations with the President prior to your appointment?

 

My second question is, should you be confirmed, as the Constitutional President of the Senate, you would have the power to take the gavel of the Senate at any point. Given the divisiveness regarding your nomination among your own party members having been led in part by the current elected President pro tempore of the Senate and his Deputy and the coming midterm elections having the potential to flip the controlling power of this body as well, do you think that it would be appropriate for you to seize the gavel from the President pro tem or their appointed representative in situations beyond an absence, a specific request, ethical inquiry, or to perform ceremonial duties? 

 

My third question is, given the sort of "front row seat" if you will that you had during that time, what would you deem the greatest diplomatic success and the worst diplomatic failure by the United States during your time on the Foreign Service from 1980 through 1995?

 

And finally, my fourth and final question for the moment. Since 2009 we have had 4 Presidents in just 8 years, and if confirmed you would be our 5th Vice President since then and the 3rd in a row to gain the position without having initially been elected to it. In addition, there have been times such as the not insignificant matter of months between the last midterms and prior to launching his campaign at the last moment and off-and-on since taking office in which President LeClavers and his White House have attracted vocal criticism for disappearing from the public eye and lacking in communication with the public and Congress. As Vice President, what assurances can you give about your activity levels and prompt availability, and do you believe changes should be made in the regularity of White House operations and communications?

 

I yield.

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1 minute ago, TheFlyingDutchman said:

Mr Chairman,

 

I have a couple of questions for the nominee.

 

01. You're opposed by pro choice interests. I know you've backed liberal Supreme Court nominees and have a holistic picture on the issue. But if you were to somehow become President, what would federal abortion policy look like? Would you sign a twenty week abortion ban if a future Congress sent it to you? Would you reinstate the Mexico City Policy set by President Reagan?

 

02. You also have a pro gun streak. Again there's a number of laws like a national concealed carry. Would you sign it if Congress sent it to you?

 

03. How would you respond to the growing threat of Russia and China to the United States' hegemony around the globe? Do you believe the United States should continue to underpin the international system set in place since 1945?

04. Do you stand behind free trade deals like NAFTA and CAFTA? Do you believe that the United States should continue negotiating free trade deals?

 

05. Occasionally the Federal Government convicts and executes people on death row.  Timothy McVeigh being one of them. As President would you sign a death warrant sent to you for signature?

 

06. Do you back moving the United States to a targeted military strategy to handle radical Islamic threats - ie, Obama's smart bomb strategy and drone strikes? Or would you support the expansive use of military strikes to go after our enemies like using MOAB in Afghanistan?

 

07. How would you characterize the radical Islamic threat that has faced us since 2001? Would you call it a problem within Islam - a largely peaceful faith - or would you characterize it as something else?

 

08. You haven't cut a wide path in the Senate and you've been fairly quiet. As we know with President LeClavers, there's a good chance you could be behind the Resolute Desk. What can you tell us about what you are and why you should be Vice President.

 

I'll ask more later. Thank you.

 

I yield.

 

 

8

 

Thank you for the questions, Senator. I will try to answer them as best as I can in the order in which they were asked. 

 

2 minutes ago, TheFlyingDutchman said:

01. You're opposed by pro choice interests. I know you've backed liberal Supreme Court nominees and have a holistic picture on the issue. But if you were to somehow become President, what would federal abortion policy look like? Would you sign a twenty week abortion ban if a future Congress sent it to you? Would you reinstate the Mexico City Policy set by President Reagan?

 

I am decidedly pro-life. I make no secret of this. I believe that life is sacred and that it is government's responsibility to ensure both the unborn and the born are protected. I believe in paid maternity and paternity leave so that parents may have time for their children while still earning an income. I believe in supporting our youth with their education and career goals so that they can become motivated and contributing members of society. I believe in an American Dream where those youth can thrive in what they do. I believe that to execute those same persons, if they have committed a crime, to be reprehensible. So yes I am pro-life, and I am unashamed of that. 

 

You ask me to speak on federal abortion policy. The Supreme Court ruled in Roe v. Wade that the right to have an abortion is protected under the Constitution. It is the responsibility of the executive to uphold the decision. 

 

I have cosponsored legislation in the Senate which would make the Mexico City Policy federal law. I do support it. 

 

15 minutes ago, TheFlyingDutchman said:

02. You also have a pro gun streak. Again there's a number of laws like a national concealed carry. Would you sign it if Congress sent it to you?

 

I think that in some areas, it can be dangerous to have certain weapons, and thus greater oversight needs to be put in place. The fact is that we have suffered great tragedies at the hands of people with guns. This cannot continue, and it is important that we recognize that some guns are not safe for public usage. This is is why local and suburban areas need to create regulations only residents of that respective jurisdiction can buy a gun in that jurisdiction. Geographically speaking, however, the majority of the nation is rural, and I am hard pressed to see how disarming law-abiding citizens will solve any of our problems. 

 

Commonsense legislation, such as the Assault Weapons Ban does a lot of good in decreasing gun crime, but we cannot have further restrictions on the city of New York, with its 8 million plus population, be the same as in Laurens County Georgia, with its population of 48 thousand. 

 

19 minutes ago, TheFlyingDutchman said:

03. How would you respond to the growing threat of Russia and China to the United States' hegemony around the globe? Do you believe the United States should continue to underpin the international system set in place since 1945?

 

 

I think both nations pose significant threats to our national interests. I think the answer to many of our problems with these nation's, however, lies in a greater renewal of our efforts within the International system. A common misconception is that further American involvement on the world stage and world organizations will take away our sovereignty. This is simply not the case. 

 

23 minutes ago, TheFlyingDutchman said:

04. Do you stand behind free trade deals like NAFTA and CAFTA? Do you believe that the United States should continue negotiating free trade deals?

 

I support Free Trade, and I support both of the agreements you mentioned. We are living in an increasingly globalized society and we need to accommodate that. Free Trade boosts economic growth and global prosperity. However, in support of Free Trade, we must also ensure that any labor which may be displaced is properly trained and transitioned into lateral or upwards positions. 

 

27 minutes ago, TheFlyingDutchman said:

05. Occasionally the Federal Government convicts and executes people on death row.  Timothy McVeigh being one of them. As President would you sign a death warrant sent to you for signature?

 

I believe I have already covered this question. I am pro-life and thus against the federal death penalty. In the respective situation, I would say a lifetime in prison and solitary confinement is a much greater punishment than death could be. 

 

29 minutes ago, TheFlyingDutchman said:

06. Do you back moving the United States to a targeted military strategy to handle radical Islamic threats - ie, Obama's smart bomb strategy and drone strikes? Or would you support the expansive use of military strikes to go after our enemies like using MOAB in Afghanistan?

 

We need to be dealing with our conflicts smarter, not harder. I support President Obama's smart bomb policy, as well as drone strikes. I won't say anything further on that matter, however, to avoid compromising strategy in public and on television. 

 

34 minutes ago, TheFlyingDutchman said:

07. How would you characterize the radical Islamic threat that has faced us since 2001? Would you call it a problem within Islam - a largely peaceful faith - or would you characterize it as something else?

 

 

Every religion has radicals, and every ideology has radicals. We cannot blame the faith. Islam is a largely peaceful religion, and our disputes lie with those who have twisted its teachings to fit their own interests. In the end, it comes down to radicals desperate for power. 

 

36 minutes ago, TheFlyingDutchman said:

08. You haven't cut a wide path in the Senate and you've been fairly quiet. As we know with President LeClavers, there's a good chance you could be behind the Resolute Desk. What can you tell us about what you are and why you should be Vice President.

 

As a Senator, my primary goal has always been to the people of Ohio before anything else. I turned down leadership within my party and within the Senate in order to represent my constituents without outside priorities and interests. I won't speculate on the President's intentions, but I do acknowledge it is important to understand who is next in line for succession. Much of who I am I said in my opening statement. I am a father, brother, husband, and patriot. I consider myself an honest chap with a reputation for impartiality and a cool head. I think if the situation arose, I am immensely qualified to serve the American people up to the end of the President's term. 

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Thank you for the questions, Senator. 

18 hours ago, Ben said:

My first question is, while the practice of law and years spent within the diplomatic ranks are certainly honorable professions, prior to your election to the United States Senate you had no real experience as an elected politician in either executive or legislative branches. In addition, not to be too frank, there seems to be no real record until very recently of you being a vocal voice on various policy matters or having any record of significant personal legislative accomplishments or bill sponsorship into your 2nd term as a US Senator. As such, could you perhaps explain what you believe your qualifications to be Vice President and by the nature of the position potentially President, are and perhaps expand on the scope of your conversations with the President prior to your appointment?

5


It's hard to answer your question, Senator, because the reality of the matter is, the American people typically decide what qualifications they want in their President and Vice President. There is no real defined qualifications like you are talking about. I have served in the Senate for the past decade, and have received generally favorable responses from my constituents to date. In this time, I became involved in the Senate Reconciliation Caucus. I know how to bridge gaps between groups and have done so with a fair amount of success. I have served my country and government abroad, and I have a sound legal mind. 

 

As to my conversations with the President, could you perhaps specify the question? I do not want to misinterpret what you are asking me. 

 

18 hours ago, Ben said:

My second question is, should you be confirmed, as the Constitutional President of the Senate, you would have the power to take the gavel of the Senate at any point. Given the divisiveness regarding your nomination among your own party members having been led in part by the current elected President pro tempore of the Senate and his Deputy and the coming midterm elections having the potential to flip the controlling power of this body as well, do you think that it would be appropriate for you to seize the gavel from the President pro tem or their appointed representative in situations beyond an absence, a specific request, ethical inquiry, or to perform ceremonial duties?

 

 

Senator, far be it from me to speculate, as exercising the Vice President's Constitutional right and responsibility of the gavel really is on a case by case basis. All I can say in any certainty with the given scope of your question is that it is entirely appropriate to exercise such responsibility to fulfill my ceremonial obligations. 

 

18 hours ago, Ben said:

My third question is, given the sort of "front row seat" if you will that you had during that time, what would you deem the greatest diplomatic success and the worst diplomatic failure by the United States during your time on the Foreign Service from 1980 through 1995?

 

This is a difficult question to sort through. The reason is, as I'm sure you know, Senator. I was stationed, at separate times, in Mauritania and Senegal. I think that when you're in the Foreign Service, you do develop a certain attachment to the country you are in. It was very hard for me at times because the dynamic and events happening within the two nation's could lead to tense relations. However, this is all part of the job. During the 1980s there was a lot happening in Western Africa and I am proud of the work Foreign Service Officers did in assisting in the stability and maintaining civil relations in the region. As for an objective success, I cannot give you an answer that fits into the fifteen year period I was abroad, and here is why. 

 

Events are constantly building upon each other. I think one of the greatest plans that really showcased a difference in the late 1980s was established in the 1940s. You may have guessed that I am talking about the Marshall Plan. The success of the Marshall Plan in Western Europe and the distinction is showed between two Europes is frankly incredible. The continued aid to Western Europe in my opinion, looking back, made the Fall of the Berlin Wall inevitable. We showed the world that Democracy can and will triumph against Communism. 

 

On the flip side, I think one of the greatest failures in that period was that our Intelligence Agency failed to predict and prepare for the fall of the Soviet Union. Obviously, I was not in the room where the big decisions were made, but I do think we could have better capitalized on opportunities to create inroads in Eastern Europe. 

 

18 hours ago, Ben said:

And finally, my fourth and final question for the moment. Since 2009 we have had 4 Presidents in just 8 years, and if confirmed you would be our 5th Vice President since then and the 3rd in a row to gain the position without having initially been elected to it. In addition, there have been times such as the not insignificant matter of months between the last midterms and prior to launching his campaign at the last moment and off-and-on since taking office in which President LeClavers and his White House have attracted vocal criticism for disappearing from the public eye and lacking in communication with the public and Congress. As Vice President, what assurances can you give about your activity levels and prompt availability, and do you believe changes should be made in the regularity of White House operations and communications?

 

Well, I cannot comment on the LeClavers Administration as of yet, however, you have my assurances that if needed, I will be available. I'm a pretty active man and I don't foresee a problem keeping up with the strains that the job might come with.  

 

((OOC: Any further assurances you need regarding my activity I'll be happy to discuss over telegram.))

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Posted (edited)

Mr. Chairman, 

 

In regards to my opening remarks, my only hope is that this hearing does not become redundant. 

 

Now for the nominee. As the Ranking Minority Member, I'd like to start by congratulating you on your nomination - as I have stated, I look forward to a fair, honest, and open confirmation hearing that will give you the opportunity to prove to us that you are qualified to serve as Vice President. Now I'd like to also thank Senators Coburn and Thomas for their great questions - I'll try to pose questions at the same caliber as these great Senators. 

  1. When we look back at history, we can see that the Vice Presidency has had some memorable officeholders who have used their position to change America. What would your priorities be as Vice President and how would you use your office to accomplish these goals? 
  2. Can you please give us a brief overview of your priorities in the following areas:
    1. Education - How often should students be assessed? Should funding be based on assessment data? Should there be national standards for all students?
    2. Taxes - If given the opportunity, what would the Baudin Tax Reform proposal look like? 
    3. Health Care - What did Obamacare get right? What did it get wrong? Should there be a public health insurance option?
  3. Following this same line of questioning, as the past two Presidents have succeeded to the office from the Vice Presidency, do you consider yourself qualified to serve as President? If so, what makes you qualified. 
  4. Finally, will you be a candidate for the Presidency in 2020? 

I yield back the balance of my time. 

Edited by Gally

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Mr. Chairman,

 

Let me thank Senator Baudin for attending, and congratulate him on his nomination. I have only a few questions. 

 

1) Is there a Vice President whose example you believe you will follow in office? 

2) Do you think your time as a Senator from Ohio will give you a greater ability to fight for Midwesterners as Vice President?

3) What is one mistake that you made in your career that has made you a better civil servant?

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3 hours ago, Gally said:

When we look back at history, we can see that the Vice Presidency has had some memorable officeholders who have used their position to change America. What would your priorities be as Vice President and how would you use your office to accomplish these goals?

 

I see the Vice Presidency as an opportunity to provide not only support but an ear to the people. Apart from ceremonial obligations as President of the Senate and the next in the line of succession, the Vice Presidency is a post where it's occupants have paved their own path in support of the Administration. My largest priorities would be education. I Believe that we need to provide quality education to our children and equip them with the right tools to succeed. We need to start recognizing that children don't cease to exist after 3:00 during the week. In at-risk neighborhoods, we need to provide programs for them in schools or community centers where they can grow and learn skills and make friends. 

 

As Vice President, I will work with Congress and the President to get initiatives passed. I know that we all possess a vested interest in our youth and their future. I will also be an advocate. I may not be as young as I was in college, but can still get on a tour bus and push for initiatives that resound with the American people. 

 

3 hours ago, Gally said:

Can you please give us a brief overview of your priorities in the following areas:

  1. Education - How often should students be assessed? Should funding be based on assessment data? Should there be national standards for all students?
  2. Taxes - If given the opportunity, what would the Baudin Tax Reform proposal look like? 
  3. Health Care - What did Obamacare get right? What did it get wrong? Should there be a public health insurance option?

 

 

This is a multi-pronged question, I'll try and answer it all as specifically as possible. 

 

Education. We should have national standards, I think we should be setting the bar high and motivating our students to reach as high as they can. I personally am not in favor of the constant assessment culture our children are now put through. We need to stop assessing our children at such a young age and decrease the frequency of assessments. They don't always show accurate data, and they force kids to learn in a certain way that might not be suited for them. We are supposed to be creating an environment where they can thrive, and sometimes that means we can't force them to conform to a style that doesn't work for them. 

 

Taxes. I think our tax code needs to be streamlined with loopholes closed. I wouldn't consider it as much a reform as a Tax Correction. Democrats and Republicans can work together to figure out a Tax Code that works for the American people, and one that they can understand. 

 

Healthcare. I support the Affordable Care Act and voted for it. I think Americans deserve Healthcare and I consider it a fundamental human right. I think it could have been rolled out much better and more efficiently. 

 

3 hours ago, Gally said:

Following this same line of questioning, as the past two Presidents have succeeded to the office from the Vice Presidency, do you consider yourself qualified to serve as President? If so, what makes you qualified. 

 

I think that in order to be qualified to be the Vice President, one has to be qualified to be President. The two are tied together, so to answer your question, I do consider myself qualified. I think my time in the Senate, as well as my time working for the Department of State and then in the private sector, have given me a well-rounded outlook on the American Dream and the people I would be representing. For the same reason I consider myself qualified to be the Vice President, I consider myself qualified to serve as President. 

 

3 hours ago, Gally said:

Finally, will you be a candidate for the Presidency in 2020?

I will not be. 

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Thank you, Senator. 

 

2 hours ago, Clay said:

1) Is there a Vice President whose example you believe you will follow in office?

 

I firmly believe in setting my own path, sir, but if I had to choose, I think that I would follow the legacy of Harry Truman. While President Truman is known for his Presidency, I would like to think that even had he not become President, I could still emulate his quiet demeanor, his reconciliatory approach, and his staunch moral compass. 

 

2 hours ago, Clay said:

2) Do you think your time as a Senator from Ohio will give you a greater ability to fight for Midwesterners as Vice President?

 

I definitely do. I think the midwest has felt largely left behind by the rest of the country, and as Vice President, I would ensure that all Americans, including those who live in the Midwest, were being fought for and worked for accordingly. 

 

2 hours ago, Clay said:

3) What is one mistake that you made in your career that has made you a better civil servant?

 

Well, as a Civil Servant fresh out of school I probably made a lot of mistakes I either have forgotten about or have blocked off in my head. *chuckles* I think in my case there was not just one mistake that led me to become good at what I did. I think the biggest thing, and this is in a general sense, was that I entered into something with certain expectations that were not necessarily correct. I grew up in the Foreign Service. When I finally finished school and joined it myself, it had changed. Times had changed and things had modernized. This was no longer the work of my father. It was my turn. It took me a while to realize this I think, but once I did I became motivated to leave an impact. It was the first time I truly felt like I believed in what I was doing. 

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With a vote of 5 Aye and 2 Nay, Vice President Nominee  Marc Baudin has passed the committee.

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We will now begin debate on the nomination of the Vice President Nominee Marc Baudin. Debate shall last till cloture is invoked.

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Mr President

 

I move for cloture

 

I yield

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Mr. President,

 

I second the call for cloture.

 

I yield.

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