Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
MrAnderson

Washington Roundup

Recommended Posts

The Washington Roundup will be short blurbs from all admins about what is happening in Washington. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Former SML Diego Zamora Claims HELP Gavel, Pushes Abortion Bill

In a move being lauded by conservatives, and yet seen as widely divisive across the country, former SML Diego Zamora (R-NM) briefly takes the gavel in the HELP Committee and pushes the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act. The move was seen as a huge victory for the pro-life movement, despite it being immediately tabled in a party-line vote. Democrats have since elevated Sen. Kamaka Nikolao (D-HI) to take over the committee. The hidden narrative here is how SMW Matthew Williams has apparently gone missing. 

 

Sen. Saunders Calls for Merchant Resignation

Sen. John Saunders (R-TX) has called for the removal of SmL Merchant (R-SC) following the ongoing budget crisis, as rumors of his absence from negotiations has become worse. Sources tell us that Saunders challenged Merchant for the party's leadership, and could still have his eyes set on taking that post. While Saunders, a TEA Party leader, condemns SML Clayborne (D-OR) and Democrats in his press office, he opens up a right flank attack on Merchant's struggles to show up for the budget crisis. 

 

Both Supreme Court Nominees Pass Committee 

Both of President LeClavers' nominees for the Supreme Court passed committee, leading them to a potential showdown on the Senate Floor. Both candidates received party-line votes in committee, with only Senator Calvin Coburn (R-KY) even showing up from the minority on the Sri Srinivasan vote. Srinivasan has already arrived on the Senate floor for deliberations, receiving a cloture motion from Sen. Diego Zamora (R-NM) and several votes from Republicans that appears to be heading towards a 90-vote passage. Judge Kelly's nomination has more questions associated with it, and should be formally moved out of committee in the coming hours. 

 

Are Democrats Admitting Moreno Was Right on Social Security? 

The bipartisan Social Security legislation introduced by former SML Diego Zamora (R-NM) and President Pro Tempore Osiris Storm (D-NY), the Bipartisan Social Security Reform Act of 2017, has become the first non-budgetary hallmark piece of legislation of the senate since Democrats took control. The problem noted by many is that it seems to implement the much-maligned raising of the retirement age pitched by the GOP's presidential nominee John Moreno (R-AZ). With a high-profile Democrat like Sen. Storm agreeing to sponsor it, Democrats appear to be admitting that the proposal of the GOP nominee was right all along, and currently the only issue with it is coming from Progressive Senator Gabriel Gonzalez (D-IL). 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vice President Bennett Resigns Amid Legal Concerns

In a surprise move, Vice President Bennett resigned from office this week due to some concerns about a possible criminal issue. The former Vice President was said to have known about the assisted suicide of his grandmother, who had a terminal form of liver cancer, and questions began to surface of his involvement in the illegal administration of a fatal dose of painkillers. While the Vice President maintained his innocence, he said in a statement that he believed that his continued place in the White House would be a distraction for the President's agenda. 

 

PPT Storm Makes Power Play in the DNC, Ruffles Feathers

Reports have surfaced that the President Pro Temp Osiris Storm (D-NY) has made a significant power play in the DNC behind the backs of other members of leadership. The source of this information expressed a wider concern with the Senate President, especially with the invokation of the so-called 'nuclear option' on Supreme Court nominee Jane Kelly without first consulting SML Claybourne (D-OR). However, the move to try to put Kelly on the court was lauded in liberal circles as the type of aggressive move the far left is looking for. Sources all say that the Senate President's position does not appear to be in any jeopardy. 

 

Dutch Savage Bucks Democrats, Becomes Lynchpin Against 'Nuclear Option' 

Senator Dutch Savage (I-IL) broke with Democrats in the use of the nuclear option to not requiring the 60-vote cloture of Supreme Court nominee Jane Kelly, meaning she could have passed with a mere majority. While espousing his complete support for Kelly, Savage argued against the rules change citing centuries of precedence. The move also received condemnation from Republicans, such as Diego Zamora (R-NM), who took a hard line opposing the nuclear option on the basis of the importance of bipartisanship. Kelly's nomination appears to be dead-in-the-water for the time being, thanks to a party-line differentiation on the nominee. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Washington Roundup

2nd Quarter, 2017

 

Historic Drug Sentencing Law Enacted

One of the most controversial policies of the War on Drugs has been dramatically altered in light of the passage and signing of the Mandatory Minimum Reform Act of 2017. Proposed by Senator Osiris Storm of New York, the bill dramatically reduces the vast majority of mandatory minimum sentences for drug related offenses as well as severely weakening the few remaining statutes. Furthermore, the bill expunges the records of all individuals twenty-one and under for first time, nonviolent offenses. The proposal passed the Democratic controlled Senate, but perhaps most surprisingly found an easy pathway through the House as well with a vote of 332-103. Only the Tea Party caucus and a small pocket of establishment Republicans opposed the bill while many of their colleagues backed the proposal. “With this bill i can proudly say that our young Americans will never have to worry about serving ridiculously long sentences for nonviolent crimes and will have their records expunged so that their prospects for jobs and to make living for themselves will never be harmed by the mistakes they have made in the past and the mistakes our government has made on legislation,” said Senator Storm after the Reform Act passed the Senate.

 

Reaction to the Mandatory Minimum Reform Act’s passage and President LeClavers signing it into law has been generally positive. NAACP President Cornell William Brooks lauded the bill as “a historic leap forward for minorities” and “arguably the most important civil rights bill to pass in two decades.”

Brooks went on further to praise both Senator Storm and the bipartisan effort on the proposal’s enactment. “The leadership of Senator Storm and the support of both Democrats and many Republicans helped this bill passed. America is a better and more just place because of it. There is still work to do, but this is a step forward."

However, while most on the political spectrum applauded the news, the Send Them Back movement and numerous Tea Party organizations condemned the Mandatory Minimum Reform Act. Former U.S. Senator from South Carolina and President of the Heritage Foundation, Jim DeMint, opposed the passage of the bill. “Ever since mandatory minimum sentences and three-strike laws were enacted in the late 1980s and early 90s, crime rates have fallen across the board. But apparently, law and order no longer matters. Politicians are now more concerned about pleasing Twitter mobs than enforcing the rule of law.”

 

 

Budget Agreement Passes, Signed into Law

After a contentious budget process, the Bipartisan Budget Proposal of 2018/2019 has passed both chambers of Capitol Hill and been signed into law by President LeClavers. Following in the footsteps of the 2014 budget agreement, the new proposal makes progress towards a balanced budget with an estimated annual deficit of $299 billion. The lowest deficit since 2007 ($161 billion), the progress made by congress over the last few years has sparked rumors on Wall Street that Standard & Poor may restore the United States triple-A credit rating after stripping the U.S. of the rating back in 2011. "Without question, the United States is at its best place financially in quite sometime," wrote John DuBois of the Wall Street. "We have the lowest deficit relative to GDP since the early 2000s. An eighty percent reduction in the deficit over the course of just six years is remarkable and reflects well on our economy and government." 

 

 

CORRECTION: The Mandatory Minimum bill was amended to significantly reduce, not completely eliminate, mandatory minimums.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WASHINGTON ROUNDUP

3rd Quarter, 2017

 

LeClavers Withdraws Kelly

In a tough blow to the LeClavers Administration, the president’s nominee to the Supreme Court, Justice Jane Kelly, was withdrawn this evening. President LeClavers announced his decision to pull Justice Kelly’s name. “The shots taken at her by the Senate GOP were not only unfair- they were simply untrue,” declared LeClavers. “However, it is clear that this nomination, while qualified, has been caught up by the Senate Minority and has been the latest victim of partisan dysfunction on the Hill. It is a disservice and a disgrace to her, the nominee, to continue to subject her to these unprecedented, unwarranted attacks on her impeccable record and career accomplishments she has throughout her own illustrious career. That is why, today, I am formally announcing my intent to withdraw her nomination to serve on the Supreme Court.”

 

Justice Kelly is the first supreme court nominee to withdrawn since Harriet Miers in 2005. Both Miers and Kelly were nominated by presidents coming off successful reelection bids. Now, President LeClavers will have to find a different nominee who can pass the Senate and eventually take the bench.

 

 

Democrats Divide Over Baudin

The battlelines are being drawn within the Democratic Party over President Harrison LeClavers’ nominee, Marc Baudin, for the U.S. Senate. While many Republicans have come forward in favor of Baudin, his nomination has brought about fierce opposition from many progressives who are breaking with the White House. And no clearer example of that split can be found than in New York where U.S. Senator Osiris Storm declared his opposition and Senator Hillary Edwards announced her support earlier today. Numerous other Democrats remain on the fence including Senator Ellen O’Brien of Wisconsin who highlighted Senator Baudin’s numerous differing positions from the mainstream Democratic Party. “While I will not oppose Senator Baudin's nomination on the merit of one policy that greatly differs from my own, I am however uncomfortable as to why President LeCleavers nominated a Vice President that holds views that are contrary to those that the party presently holds,” said O’Brien. Indeed, all the eyes of Washington are on the Baudin nomination as we draw closer to a final vote.

 

 

GOP Elects New Chair

U.S. Senator George Maynard of North Dakota was elected the Republican Party Chairman today. Chairman Maynard pledged to breathe new energy and change to the GOP after three straight losses in presidential elections and the disappointing 2014 midterms. “I hope to bring fresh leadership to our party's executive organization as we move forward into a crucial period in our nation's history… I intend to be a Chairman that embraces innovation and strengthening the bond between the many members of our party as we gear up to take back Congress next November.”

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Republicans Raise Complaints About Committee Hearing Lengths

In an unexpected move, Senate Republican Leader John Saunders has taken to twitter with his intent to refuse to confirm any nominee who undergoes the customary ((72 hour)) hearing in the Senate committees. The move appears to be one where the leader is searching for reasons to oppose the nominees, looking to draw blood on President LeClavers and set the stage to excite the GOP base in advance of the 2018 midterms. The move comes after growing concerns that the hostile questioning taken by Senator Saunders in the early period of the Attorney General's hearing that involved an insulting question of "Looking at your very clearly under-developed resume, what type of work did you do at the Department of Justice Civil Rights Division?" The attack on the resume of a 15 year veteran of the Justice Department has raised the alarm among women's groups and minority advocacy groups, who claim the question is designed to attempt to diminish the work of a black woman and was echoed in the response of Ms. Butler. Currently, 84% of Americans feel the AG nominee has the requisite experience to be Attorney General, though the question of supporting her candidacy has more than 50% undecided. It appears the Secretary of State nominee, Henry Rex, will be caught in the committee rules battle as well. 

 

Polling Shows LeClavers Could Hurt Some Democrats in 2018

While the President's approval rating remains only slightly below water, Democrats facing a difficult 2018 map should be concerned about the role the President may play in some states in the coming election. With incumbents in North Dakota, Montana, Missouri, West Virginia, Indiana and more that have been strong Republican states in recent Presidential elections, none of which voted for LeClavers in the last election, Democrats must be concerned that the White House will be an albatross in their quest to retain the Senate. The President has more than 10% more disapprovals than approvals in each of these five states. One prominent Washington Democrat said "Red State Democrats should run on their own achievements. Democrats are making strides, but without much help from the President. Let them run on what they're doing right, not on what LeClavers isn't doing." That sentiment appears to be concerning for a White House in need of political capital and dangerous for Democrats moving forward. 

 

Debate on Voter ID Laws Brought to Washington

The question of Voter ID Laws, traditionally one that has been a state issue for years, has gone to Washington in the form of an amendment to the Restoring Integrity to American Elections Act. Senator John Saunders (R-TX) introduced the amendment to the Restoring Integrity to American Elections Act, which has sparked a full court press war between Saunders and Progressive Senator Kamaka Nikolao (D-HI). The Hawaii Senator stated "The amendment by the GOP is nothing but a roadblock to discourage people from voting by adding all these steps to be able to vote", which promptly led to a response from Saunders criticizing his reading of bill, stating it allowed for provisional ballots for those who vote without an ID. Voter ID laws have long been a partisan issue at the state level, with many concerned about their constitutionality as a similarity to a poll tax. However, 75% of Americans still support some form of voter ID being required at the poll. Leaders of the #SendThemBack movement have cheered the move by Senator Saunders, claiming that voter ID laws have to be used to ensure that illegal immigrants aren't voting. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Washington Roundup

 

Thin Blue Line Act Draws Attention in Washington

Debate over the 'Thin Blue Line' Act in the Senate has drawn attention from political action groups across the country. Groups such as Black Lives Matter, a group protesting police brutality and police shootings, have called  debate on the legislation "an obscene slap in the face" from Congress. The Thin Blue Line Act would include the murder of a police officer into an aggravating factor to receive the death penalty. Meanwhile, there have been several high-profile cases of police shootings of African-American men which have caused ire in many American communities. On the Senate Floor, Senate Minority Leader John Saunders (R-TX) said the bill would help "restore security, dignity and reassure the families of our first response teams." Senator Christopher Donnelly (R-TN) made similar arguments, saying that America "cannot give potential criminals the ability to commit crimes against our law enforcement officers without the fear of harsh punishments," referring to the death penalty. 

 

Meanwhile, Senator Osiris Storm (D-NY) has offered amendments which would strip the legislation of its original concept and replace it with "de-escalation training" and provide grants to law enforcement agencies to institute this new training. Republicans have called the amendments absurd while Democrats have made it clear their opposition to further use of the death penalty as a deterrent of crime. Republicans have attempted to receive cloture on the legislation, ever following the passage of some Democratic amendments, yet Democrats have now maneuvered to recommit the bill to committee. Some analysts believe debate over the policy is more inclined to highlight the killings of suspects by the police and a larger debate altogether on law enforcement and criminal justice. Groups such as law enforcement unions have backed the legislation while grassroots movements, specifically of those organized by African American's, have called for its defeat. 

 

Will Baudin Overtake the 'Storm Agenda'? 

Seasoned political analyst and author Jacob Olliver has written a new editorial, questioning whether or not President Baudin will begin to exercise the authority of the President to drive the agenda and news cycle -- departing from the strategy of former President Harrison LeClavers, whom many analysts have agreed did not use the pulpit of the Presidency to advance a specific agenda. On the sidelines, however, Senator Osiris Storm (D-NY) has been pushing an agenda and using his clout in the Senate to do it. The RURAL Broadband Act of 2017, sponsored by Storm, allows the Rural Utilities Service to assist providers in setting up infrastructure to provide broad-band internet in rural areas. The legislation passed the Senate with unanimous consent and the House followed. The Mandatory Minimum Reform Act, again sponsored by Storm, was a more ambitious and controversial proposal. It received a lot of debate and back and forth, especially in the House, but it still managed to pass. Finally, Storm was reportedly instrumental in the most recent bipartisan budget proposal, playing a large part in its passage through Congress. Democrats achieved various permanent reauthorizations of programs which have, in the past, been viewed as potential sticking points for Republican voters. 

 

In his editorial, Olliver question whether or not the new President -- whom Storm opposed during the nomination process of him becoming Vice President -- will retake the mantel of leading the Democratic Party and their agenda. If that is the case, analysts are wondering what that agenda might be. Senator Storm has recently released his lofty goal of MediChoice, a public option which would expand Medicare and Medicaid exponentially. It remains to be seen if the President intends to push  legislation of his own or whether or not he will stand behind Storm's proposal, which he formerly cosponsored, and make it a major priority.

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Washington Roundup

  

Abortion Bill Looms Over HELP Committee

The Dilation and Evacuation Abortion Ban Act of 2017, introduced by Sen. Kahuhu (R-ID) and cosponsored by GOP Leader John Saunders (R-TX) has been sent to committee and awaits the potential for a hearing. It seems unlikely that the bill will gain the support of prominent Democrats, specifically HELP Chairman Nikolao (D-HI). The bill has received the full support of the National Right to Life Committee, a prominent right-wing lobbying organization. The group has been trying to rally the group around the move, despite Republicans largely abandoning the focus on abortion in the prior several elections. The group's revival has largely been the product of growing frustration among the religious right in the country for being ignored. The move would be a massive change in abortion procedures, banning a technique predominantly used in second-trimester abortion, as Dilation and Vacuum Curettage is used in earlier stages of pregnancy. Women's groups have, unsurprisingly, condemned the bill. It remains to be seen if President Baudin, noted as a pro-life Democrat, will sign the bill were it to ever pass the Senate. 

 

Storm-Saunders Spat Lights Up Senate Floor

During a Committee of the Whole meeting intended to relieve Republican concerns over the level of questioning being received by AG Nominee Tracie Hattie Butler, a spat between PPT Storm (D-NY) and GOP Leader Saunders (R-TX) took a turn towards nasty. The committee meeting had received no interest from either party when Senator Saunders asked the PPT to end the meeting, which was met with contention by Storm. Calling a Committee of the Whole for a cabinet nominee is incredibly rare, and the silence by both parties has largely reinforced opinions of both sides. Hattie Butler remains being viewed as largely qualified for the position. This comes just days after Senator Saunders chose not to invoke a party whip on the nomination. As of now, the Attorney General stays waiting for a vote before the Senate. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.