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Tilsley

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Tilsley last won the day on September 16

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  1. Tilsley

    Balanced Budget Amendment

    CS
  2. Tilsley begins fifth term in Congress Washington, D.C.--Congressman Ron Tilsley boarded an early morning flight from Spokane International Airport to fly east to what he calls "the other Washington". Hours later, he is welcomed back by staffers at his office in the Longworth House Building and spoke to his staffers about the road ahead in the 100th Congress. "This is a very important session for us," said Tilsley. "I'm looking forward to what we're going to accomplish in terms of policy and what we can get done in the last two years of the Reagan presidency." Tilsley later spoke to reporters about his goals on what he intends to accomplish in his fifth term. "To begin, I'm looking to help push through policies that will focus on our economy. I think we've got some pretty good ideas on how to improve the economy, create better jobs, and build a more robust middle class America," Tilsley said. His goal will likely become reality as he was named to the House Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. "To sit on this important committee is a blessing to me. We're facing a great deal of issues that we would want to focus on in this committee," Tilsley said. "We're dealing with an AIDS epidemic that has long been committing a reign of terror on our population. We're dealing with a new kind of dangerous drug epidemic that is spurring violent crime. I could go on all day, but there's a lot of work to do. And we as a legislative body will do our best to get it done." --30--
  3. All fundraisers are documented and found here:
  4. Official Voting Record of Ron Tilsley (D-WA-5) 100th Congress AYE: NAY: PRESENT: BILLS CO-SPONSORED: BILLS AUTHORED:
  5. All press releases from the office of Congressman Ron Tilsley go here.
  6. Tilsley

    Alternate Presidents Game

    The Democratic ticket led by Colorado Senator Gary Hart and Texas Senator Lloyd Bentsen ended the 12 year Republican reign in Washington with a resounding victory in the 1980 election. As the calendar turned to 1981, Americans were feeling a change in the air both at home and abroad. The economic continued to grow but at a slightly slower pace in 1981 than it did in the last years of the 1970s. Meanwhile, unemployment remained an issue and the Hart administration was determined to reduce the number of Americans unemployed by 1983. Meanwhile abroad, the Middle East witnessed a rapid escalation in violent incidents that would continue to stall any peace talks between Israel and Egypt. Meanwhile, the hostile showdown between the U.S. and Iran had finally ended with the hostages being freed. Domestic front President Hart took office and laid out his plans for America in his first four years as President. On his first full day of his presidency, President Hart met with Congressional leaders regarding his plans with the upcoming Federal Budget. Among one of his main intentions was to reduce military spending, which drew the ire of many Republicans, including former VP candidate and now Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole. Dole went as far to call Hart’s plan to reduce military spending “insane”. Meanwhile, Hart decided to lay out his economic plan which included job training for young and disadvantaged American, fairer policies for women in the workplace, and providing tax breaks to small businesses, including businesses which were considered “employee owned”. To stimulate growth, he included a plan to eliminate taxes that were targeting savings and investment. 1982 and 1983 witnessed a dramatic decline in the country’s unemployment rate thanks to small businesses being able to invest in creating more jobs. In which President Hart declared in the 1983 State of the Union Address that “Main Street is open for business and better than ever”. Another pillar in the decline of unemployment saw a rise in young women, specifically single mothers, taking job training in such skills like accounting and office typing as part of their terms while collecting welfare. This was credited by an unconventional idea hammered out by Hart and congressional Republicans agreeing that aided those on welfare that were transitioning into the workforce and adjusting to life with their new jobs while their benefits phased out. Foreign Front After a near two year ordeal, the US Embassy hostages in Tehran were freed after secret negotiations were proved to be successful. Hours after the inauguration, Vice President Bentsen’s eventful day took a turn for the unconventional. Upon learning of the release of the hostages, Bentsen arrived at Andrews AFB in the late night hours to travel to Germany in a surprise visit to meet the hostages and escort them back home. Many of them were understandably upset and felt that the Ford administration did not do enough in an effort to free them. Despite the successful negotiations, the Hart administration made no plans regarding US-Iran relations going forward. Though Iran released the hostages, problems continued to mount for the Khomeini regime. That problem came in the form of Saddam Hussein, the leader of the neighboring country of Iraq. While Hussein praised the new Revolution in Iran, Khomeini rebuffed Saddam. Meanwhile, Hussein had ulterior motives of his own. Hussein believed that with Egypt facing problems with Israel over peace talks and Iran weakened from the Revolution and their tensions with the United States, he had a chance to establish himself as the new “leader of the Arab world”. In early 1981, Saddam and Iraqi forces successfully invaded and annexed oil rich provinces within Iran’s borders, triggering a war between the two countries. Though the U.S. had no intention of repairing relations with Iran, they sent aid to Saddam and the Iraqi government in their efforts. This further infuriated Khomeini and he continously vowed revenge against the United States and any nation that aligned with Iraq. Meanwhile, in Egypt, tensions began to escalate between Egypt and Israel despite a number of failed attempts of peace talks. The Hart administration at the start of 1981 had tried to encourage both Israeli Prime Minister Begin and Egyptian President Anwar al-Sadat to pick up where they left off since the Ford years, but neither side refused. When Sadat visited Hart in Washington in May 1981, Sadat feared that a peace deal with Israel would result in what he considered “dangerous implications”. These implications were based on threats from Arab nations like Libya, Syria, and Iraq. Upon hearing of Sadat’s apparent reservations, Hart conversed with Begin the following day, leading to a secret summit at Camp David that would take place in September 1981. Details of the summit were kept on a lid and no one in the media was made aware of the talks. The summit lasted three days at Camp David. President Hart would announce that peace between Israel and Egypt were finally achieved in a primetime Oval Office address to the nation. When word got around in Egypt about the successful peace talks, hardlining Islamists were infuriated and began rioting in the streets. Many of them demanded Sadat to resign. Since the talks, Sadat remained largely out of sight from the public for fear that his life may be in danger, even after a few failed attempts to overthrow him. In the Soviet Union, the battled raged on between Afghanistan and the Soviets throughout 1981. In 1982, General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev was facing a series of health issues and had plans to consult with the Central Committee on who would be his replacement if he decided to vacate the office or die. Before such discussions were made, Brezhnev dies. This left the country in a state of in a mix of grief and confusion as the Soviet people were left wondering who would lead the country. After two days of deliberation, Mikhail Gorbachev was named the new General Secretary to the surprise of many. Some believed that Yuri Andropov or Konstantin Chernenko as the successor, but Gorbachev was seen as more youthful and as the more long-term option over the older Andropov and Chernenko. 1984 Election In the beginning of his first term, the American people were uncertain as to how President Hart would govern, considering that he was an unknown to voters before his rise and eventual victory just four years earlier. As the economy witnessed even greater growth, Hart’s popularity began to rise. His declaration of “Main Street is back” gave the American people a new sense of confidence and highly approved of Hart. His approval ratings would stay well into the high 50% and had at one point peaked at about 61%. However, Hart was not without any staunch opposition. Former Vice Presidential candidate and Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole was a frequent critic of the Hart administration and their policies. His major gripe with Hart was on the reduction of defense spending, calling it “insane” and “dangerous” at a time when tensions between the U.S. and the Soviet Union still ran high and Khomeini’s consistent threats as part of the U.S aiding Saddam Hussein. It wasn’t until the Camp David peace agreement when Hussein rebuffed any aid from the U.S. as retaliation. It was clear that Dole would be the major front-runner for the Republican nomination in 1984. He sailed through the GOP primaries and selected former Congressman and former CIA director George H.W. Bush as his running mate. The debates were tense at time, but both candidates were able to get their points across, with Hart further referring to his accomplishments as to why he deserved a second term. On Election night, Hart secured his second term with a win over the Dole/Bush ticket. The biggest surprise of the night was when Texas, long to have been a lock in the GOP column, had flipped to blue thanks to the popularity of their Vice President and native son, Lloyd Bentsen. Dole/Bush carried most of the South and the heartland, but could only net 141 electoral votes to Hart’s 397.
  7. Tilsley

    BJ Welles (D-TX-27)

    Is the Kinky avatar making a comeback? #IMembaHim
  8. Tilsley

    Ron Tilsley (D-WA-5)

    Name: Ron Tilsley Avatar: Joseph P. Kennedy II Age: 43 (Born February 3, 1944) Place of Birth: San Diego, California Residence: Spokane, Washington Party: Democratic State/District: Washington, 5th Congressional District Faction: New Democrat Religion: Roman Catholic Wealth: Upper Middle Class Family: Susan (Wife; b. 1951 m. 1973) Ron Jr. (Son; b. 1975) Ruth Ann (Daughter; b. 1978) Education: 1962-1966: Washington State University (B.A.--International Affairs) 1966-1969: University of Southern California (J.D.) Employment: 1965: Intern for Sen. Henry "Scoop" Jackson 1969-1972: Aide to the Senate Judiciary Committee 1972: Assistant campaign manager, "Scoop" Jackson presidential campaign 1973-1979: Private practice attorney 1975-1976: State campaign chairman, "Scoop" Jackson for president. Elected History: 1979-present: Congressional representative, Washington's 5th Congressional district (First elected in 1978) Biography: Ron Tilsley was born February 3, 1944 in San Diego, California. His father was an Army Air Force pilot who was deployed to the Pacific theater of World War II shortly after his birth. His mother raised Ron and their two other children and worked as an executive assistant. After his father's discharge from the military in 1952, Ron and his family relocated to Spokane, Washington. His father would later start a construction business, where Ronnie would work on various projects during his summers off from school. For much of his childhood, Ron was a dedicated student and often received high honors academically. He had an interest in politics in the late 1950s when he watched a speech of President Eisenhower. However, it was the rise of John F. Kennedy that set the wheels in motion for young Ronnie to take up a career in public service. Ron attended Washington State University in Pullman and graduated with a degree in International Affairs in 1966. The summer before, he was on a trip to Washington D.C. and by chance encounter met with Senator Henry "Scoop" Jackson. Jackson would play a major role throughout Ron's career in public service. He interned for Jackson in the summer of 1965 and would later worked on his presidential campaign in 1972. Given his deep California ties, Ron decided to attend law school at University of Southern California from 1966-1969. Despite performing quite well, he was known by his classmates as the "life of the party". That reputation was carried with him during his tenure in Washington D.C. as a Senate aide. At a birthday party of one of his fellow Senate aides, he met Susan Bradford, a journalism student who attended Georgetown. The pair married in 1973 and reside in Spokane with two children, Ron Jr. and Ruth Ann. Shortly after getting married, Ron started a private practice with a friend in law school. They focused on criminal law and at times defended clients who were being tried in serious criminal cases, but could not afford an attorney. Unable to take on a major role in "Scoop" Jackson's bid for the presidency in 1976, Ron took on the role of campaign chair for Washington state. Throughout his experience in working on political campaigns, he made connections with those within the Democratic party. With then-Congressman Tom Foley retiring in 1978, members of the Democratic party urged Ron to run for Congress. He won the seat by 10 percentage points over his Republican challenger. Ron is currently in his fifth term as the Congressman for Washington's 5th, having been re-elected in 1986 by a wide margin.
  9. Tilsley

    Alternate Presidents Game

    I'm in. I'll go after @Holson
  10. Tilsley

    Reset 2 Character Planning Thread

    Well...since I finally have more time on my hands...I'll throw in and stick around this time. Name: Ron Tilsley Age: 43 (Born February 3, 1944) Place of Birth: San Diego, California Residence: Spokane, Washington Party: Democratic State/District: Washington, 5th Congressional District Faction: Moderate Religion: Roman Catholic Wealth: Upper Middle Class Family: Susan (Wife; b. 1951 m. 1973) Ron Jr. (Son; b. 1975) Ruth Ann (Daughter; b. 1978) Education: 1962-1966: Washington State University (B.A.--International Affairs) 1966-1969: University of Southern California (J.D.) Employment: 1965: Intern for Sen. Henry "Scoop" Jackson 1969-1972: Aide to the Senate Judiciary Committee 1972: Assistant campaign manager, "Scoop" Jackson presidential campaign 1973-1979: Private practice attorney 1975-1976: State campaign chairman, "Scoop" Jackson for president. Elected History: 1979-present: Congressional representative, Washington's 5th Congressional district (First elected in 1978) Biography: Ron Tilsley was born February 3, 1944 in San Diego, California. His father was an Army Air Force pilot who was deployed to the Pacific theater of World War II shortly after his birth. His mother raised Ron and their two other children and worked as an executive assistant. After his father's discharge from the military in 1952, Ron and his family relocated to Spokane, Washington. His father would later start a construction business, where Ronnie would work on various projects during his summers off from school. For much of his childhood, Ron was a dedicated student and often received high honors academically. He had an interest in politics in the late 1950s when he watched a speech of President Eisenhower. However, it was the rise of John F. Kennedy that set the wheels in motion for young Ronnie to take up a career in public service. Ron attended Washington State University in Pullman and graduated with a degree in International Affairs in 1966. The summer before, he was on a trip to Washington D.C. and by chance encounter met with Senator Henry "Scoop" Jackson. Jackson would play a major role throughout Ron's career in public service. He interned for Jackson in the summer of 1965 and would later worked on his presidential campaign in 1972. Given his deep California ties, Ron decided to attend law school at University of Southern California from 1966-1969. Despite performing quite well, he was known by his classmates as the "life of the party". That reputation was carried with him during his tenure in Washington D.C. as a Senate aide. At a birthday party of one of his fellow Senate aides, he met Susan Bradford, a journalism student who attended Georgetown. The pair married in 1973 and reside in Spokane with two children, Ron Jr. and Ruth Ann. Shortly after getting married, Ron started a private practice with a friend in law school. They focused on criminal law and at times defended clients who were being tried in serious criminal cases, but could not afford an attorney. Unable to take on a major role in "Scoop" Jackson's bid for the presidency in 1976, Ron took on the role of campaign chair for Washington state. Throughout his experience in working on political campaigns, he made connections with those within the Democratic party. With then-Congressman Tom Foley retiring in 1978, members of the Democratic party urged Ron to run for Congress. He won the seat by 10 percentage points over his Republican challenger. Ron is currently in his fifth term as the Congressman for Washington's 5th, having been re-elected in 1986 by a wide margin. EDIT #1: Ron is in his fifth term for Congress...not fourth. EDIT #2: Added Faction to bio...will remain TBD until I know more about this feature. Also, avatar is changed to Joseph Kennedy II. Was going to go for Gary Hart...but changed for obvious reason.
  11. Tilsley

    Ron Tilsley (R-CO)

    Yessir. The legend returns.
  12. Name: Ronald Tilsley Character Type: Senate Party: Republican Political Leaning: Libertarian Republican Date of Birth: January 6, 1966 Place of Birth: Denver, Colorado Residence: Aurora, Colorado Race: White Gender: Male Religion: Methodist Family Information: Patricia (Wife ; b. 1969 m. 1994) Ron Jr. (Son ; b. 1996) Lily (Daughter ; b. 2001) Educational History 1984-1988: University of Colorado-Boulder (B.A.--Business Administration) Occupational History 1988-1991: Denver Post, Advertising Clerk 1991-2005: Restaurant Owner (various locations across Colorado) 1993-2001: State Representative, Colorado House of Representatives 2001-2005: Senator, Colorado State Senate 2005-2009: Congressman, Colorado's 4th Congressional District 2009-Present: United States Senate Biography: Ron Tilsley was born January 6, 1966 in Denver, Colorado. His father was a police officer and his mother was a high school English teacher. Growing up in a middle class family, Ron grew up developing what his peers describe as a "tireless work ethic" and a penchant for helping those who needed it most. Though he was considered gifted and talented by his teachers, Ron was not always a dedicated student and nearly had to repeat the 8th grade. But he acquired mentorship from a former Army Ranger turned history teacher that would tutor him and helped improve his grades. Throughout high school, Ron unleashed his full academic potential and finished in the top 10 of his high school class. During the summer months, he would often end up working for himself doing yard work in area neighborhoods. That culminated into shoveling snow in the winter. That lead to Ron's interest in pursuing business later on in his life. After graduating high school, Ron attended the University of Colorado in Boulder where he acquired a degree in business administration. His first job was working for the Denver Post selling advertising to local businesses. While he dealt with a ton of rejection, Ron sharpened his sales skills and called it "one of his worst...but best jobs" he's had as it helped developed his overall character. Having saved enough money by 1991, Ron and two of his friends from college purchased a Winnebago with a trailer and operated a "taco stand on wheels" business. The trio would traverse the state of Colorado and made it a profitable business. They made enough to open a permanent location in Aurora in one year. Ron leveraged his success of being a restaurateur and later owned and operated restaurants across the state. But the success didn't come so easy. In 1992, faced with the frustration of overbearing regulations, Ron decided to run for the Colorado House of Representatives with the mission that "if anyone wants to carve out a piece of the American Dream, they should do so without standing in the way". After serving 4 terms as a state representative, Ron was considering the idea of returning to private life to invest more time in his restaurants. But after being urged by many friends and fellow Republicans, Ron decided to run for State Senate and won by a narrow margin. In 2004, his public life came full circle when he decided to run for Congress in Colorado's 4th. This time, his frustration was focused on the War in Iraq and the growth of government. His popularity among his constituents made him the talk of the possibility of pursuing a higher office. That decision was made in 2008 when Ron entered the race for US Senate, narrowly defeating Mark Udall. Ron continues to serve in the US Senate as of 2015, citing Ronald Reagan and Barry Goldwater as his political heroes. Ron married his wife Patricia, a psychiatrist in 1994. The two reside in Aurora, Colorado with their two children, Ron Jr. and Lily. Ron Jr. is currently a civil engineering major at Colorado State University. In his spare time, Ron can be seen dabbling in various outdoor activities, playing guitar and is a die-hard fan of the Denver Broncos. He humorously states that his life motto is "Family. Freedom. And the Denver Broncos."
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